Has anyone here had what they believe to be a glimpse of the afterlife?

bluebird

Major Contributor
I can think only of kim who has had an NDE and she told us about it on various occasions. I don't think she'll mind my telling you it happened in Wales, UK, where she was stationed when she was in the military. She came off her pedal cycle and her head was badly injured. She was in a coma for some time during which she had the near-death experience that changed her life and her outlook.

Along with most other one-time regulars she's now just an occasional visitor. All her previous questions and conversations should still be accessible by using the 'advanced search' section of the general 'Search' utility whose looking-glass icon can be seen top right.

NDEs, though, are not what bluebird was asking about although in reality the only experiences of life beyond corporeal death come from those experiencing them - by definition. Other experiences, told by those still alive in this world, may have similarities to the 'actual-death-experience' but - again by definition - can be only similarities. I could go on about why but we've walked this path before.

I do, though, totally get that people may believe they died and then 'came back to life'. We could argue the point forever but those who influence my approach have told us repeatedly that death is a one-way journey. It truly is a "When yer dead, yer dead!" situation. When you're dead - when you're body is dead - there's no 'coming back' by your animating spirit to re-animate the body. If that appears to have happened then again by definition it was a near-death experience. To others you may have appeared near to death. You may actually have been close to dying inasmuch as your animating spirit was struggling to keep your body alive because of injury or whatever. But if it eventually did manage to continue animating your body and you later recovered then it was a case of classic near-death-exerience. That's a definition of NDE.

I don't know if I've just coined the expression 'actual-death-experience' (ADE) or if it's being used out there on the world-wide-web. Either way I think it's important to understand that NDE and ADE may seem similar, and in some scenarios may be similar, but they're not similar in every sense. That's got to be doubly tricky for you, bb, because you're not even persuaded that there is life beyond death in the first place. Thinking back I don't remember when the separation of the two became clear in my mind. Maybe similarly to the notion of so-called exit points these companion ADE/NDE notions settled in my psyche long before they became clear? Cloudiness and sediment in some wines clears over time to leave perfect clarity; I think my repeatedly turning over these ideas for a long time has led to eventual clarity of my understanding.

By comparison, I've done something similar with exit points (and other ideas) but it led to my rejecting some of the ways they've been presented and not necessarily their totality.

I do see what you mean, mac. I suppose I view it as an afterlife experience, rather than an NDE, if the earthly body was declared dead by a doctor due to a complete lack of neurological and cardiac activity for at least a few moments -- or at least, that's close enough for what I mean.

What do you (or anyone else here) think of Eben Alexander and his book "Proof of Heaven"? He is a neurosurgeon (he was trained at Harvard) who had an NDE -- I know he had contracted a brain disease, I think it was meningitis. After recovering, he asserted that while ill there was no way his brain could have functioned to show him the things he saw, and that it was his soul/spirit which experienced those things. I read the book a few years ago, and appreciated it, but as with all such things it is not actually proof to me, and I'd be interested to know what you and others think of it, if you've read it.
 

mac

janitor
I do see what you mean, mac. I suppose I view it as an afterlife experience, rather than an NDE, if the earthly body was declared dead by a doctor due to a complete lack of neurological and cardiac activity for at least a few moments -- or at least, that's close enough for what I mean.

What do you (or anyone else here) think of Eben Alexander and his book "Proof of Heaven"? He is a neurosurgeon (trained at Harvard) who had an NDE -- I know he had contracted a brain disease, I think it was meningitis. He asserted that there was no way his brain could have functioned to show him the things he saw, and that it was his soul/spirit which experienced those things. I read the book a few years ago, and appreciated it, but as with all such things it is not actually proof to me, and I'd be interested to know what you and others think of it, if you've read it.
I thought you might have meant that, bb, but apparent death is not the same as death. We believe our doctors know about death but they know only what they can observe and measure - that's really not very much.....;)

I know about Alexander's book but I haven't read it as there really is no point for me. I don't doubt what he experienced any more than I doubt what kim has told me over the years. Of course it's not empirical proof of anything at all but for me it's simply another piece of evidence of something about which I need neither proof nor any additional evidence.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
I thought you might have meant that, bb, but apparent death is not the same as death. We believe our doctors know about death but they know only what they can observe and measure - that's really not very much.....;)

I know about Alexander's book but I haven't read it as there really is no point for me. I don't doubt what he experienced any more than I doubt what kim has told me over the years. Of course it's not empirical proof of anything at all but for me it's simply another piece of evidence of something about which I need neither proof nor any additional evidence.
Makes sense. ;)
 

ravensgate

Regular Contributor
I read Alexander's book. Imho, it is a book about his personal NDE, and nothing really stood out for me, except when he saw the picture of his biological sister who had died in her early twenties, I believe. He never knew her (he was adopted), but when he saw the picture he recognized the young woman who was with him in the other realm (she served as his guide). This - provided it is true - is what made his book different from others.... for me. Reading about drangonflies, butterflies, bluebirds, etc. is not enough for me. I am most interested in veridical experiences.
Dr. Alexander was ill with meningitis caused by E.coli. He was given less than 3% chance of recovery, if I remember correctly.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
I read Alexander's book. Imho, it is a book about his personal NDE, and nothing really stood out for me, except when he saw the picture of his biological sister who had died in her early twenties, I believe. He never knew her (he was adopted), but when he saw the picture he recognized the young woman who was with him in the other realm (she served as his guide). This - provided it is true - is what made his book different from others.... for me. Reading about drangonflies, butterflies, bluebirds, etc. is not enough for me. I am most interested in veridical experiences.
Dr. Alexander was ill with meningitis caused by E.coli. He was given less than 3% chance of recovery, if I remember correctly.
It may be time for me to re-read his book again, as I didn't remember the part about his bio sister. I think you're right about him having had a very slim chance of recovery.

Reading about dragonflies, etc., doesn't do much for me either (my own signs of that type mean something to me, and I'm not saying those sorts of signs experienced by others don't mean something to them, but other peoples' experiences of that sort aren't convincing to me) -- I would prefer to hear about provable stuff, too.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
Bumping this up, as I hope more people have had experiences that they would be willing to share.
 

Auras

New Member
Bumping this up, as I hope more people have had experiences that they would be willing to share.
In an earlier reply to you, I mentioned that I haven't had any of these experiences, more so because the experience I had seems rather ridiculous, like those who claim to communicate with Jesus. I remember sometime ago I spoke to an SNU member and she told me that there are plenty of people who claim to communicate with Jesus.

I don't really tell others about this experience because I have at times, been called delusional but it's worth a share so take from it what you will. This experience happened at a very hard time in my life. I used to believe what I felt and saw was real but overtime, as I have grew up I have adapted a more logical mindset.

Anyway, one night as I were laying in bed with my eyes closed, I found myself standing in an area, By the looks of it, It seemed like I was in Egypt, I could see the dust of the sand in the air, the plants sticking out so vibrantly. I saw a man who at the time of the experience, I thought was Jesus. I did not speak and neither did he. We were just standing in each-others presence. He had brown hair, wearing brown ragged clothes. I started to feel a surge of vibrations all over my body, the longer I stood there the more intense and vibrant it got. I felt uplifted, I felt healed, I felt love, I felt positive, I felt happy, but mostly I felt released from all of my problems. I opened my eyes and I could still feel it, days go by and I can still feel the surge of vibrations. The sensations started to disappear after a few weeks but how I felt has never left me and it will be in my memory until the day I pass. It was a magical moment whether It was real or not.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
In an earlier reply to you, I mentioned that I haven't had any of these experiences, more so because the experience I had seems rather ridiculous, like those who claim to communicate with Jesus. I remember sometime ago I spoke to an SNU member and she told me that there are plenty of people who claim to communicate with Jesus.

I don't really tell others about this experience because I have at times, been called delusional but it's worth a share so take from it what you will. This experience happened at a very hard time in my life. I used to believe what I felt and saw was real but overtime, as I have grew up I have adapted a more logical mindset.

Anyway, one night as I were laying in bed with my eyes closed, I found myself standing in an area, By the looks of it, It seemed like I was in Egypt, I could see the dust of the sand in the air, the plants sticking out so vibrantly. I saw a man who at the time of the experience, I thought was Jesus. I did not speak and neither did he. We were just standing in each-others presence. He had brown hair, wearing brown ragged clothes. I started to feel a surge of vibrations all over my body, the longer I stood there the more intense and vibrant it got. I felt uplifted, I felt healed, I felt love, I felt positive, I felt happy, but mostly I felt released from all of my problems. I opened my eyes and I could still feel it, days go by and I can still feel the surge of vibrations. The sensations started to disappear after a few weeks but how I felt has never left me and it will be in my memory until the day I pass. It was a magical moment whether It was real or not.
Thank you so much for sharing that, Auras. Whether that was Jesus or not, it does sound like a wonderful experience, and perhaps a moment of connection with the divine. In some ways it does resemble other stories I've read from people who felt they experienced god.

I know what it's like to initially believe in an experience but then to begin to doubt it later -- it happens to me all too often when it comes to possible signs from my husband. I think that if you are able to hold on to your belief and to the way the experience made you feel, it would be good to do so.

Again, thank you for be willing to share that very personal moment here.
 

Auras

New Member
Thank you so much for sharing that, Auras. Whether that was Jesus or not, it does sound like a wonderful experience, and perhaps a moment of connection with the divine. In some ways it does resemble other stories I've read from people who felt they experienced god.

I know what it's like to initially believe in an experience but then to begin to doubt it later -- it happens to me all too often when it comes to possible signs from my husband. I think that if you are able to hold on to your belief and to the way the experience made you feel, it would be good to do so.

Again, thank you for be willing to share that very personal moment here.
Hi, Bluebird.

It seems most of my spiritual experiences happened as a kid up until my early teens. It seems somewhat quiet now... I am always questioning my belief in the afterlife but it feels like one of them "it's too good to be true" things. While I have many doubts of whether it's real or not, one thing is for certain is that I'll always have hope.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
It does seem that kids are more likely to have spiritual experiences -- and the younger they are, the more likely. Whether this is because they are not as far removed from "heaven" (having supposedly been there before birth), or because they have vivid imaginations, or both, I don't know, but it does seem to hold true.

You are lucky to have hope (I mean that genuinely).
 
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