gloomy

mac

janitor
World leaders are meeting to discuss the future of this world. My god I would love to feel optimistic that self-interests might be set aside and the whole world would work together to try to limit the seemingly inexorable, catastrophic changes we are all facing. But I doubt humankind and nations overall have progressed spiritually sufficiently to work together as they truly need to do now.

For some time I've been getting the feeling that in the next few years and decades there will be changes of scarcely imaginable magnitude. And the ones that can be imagined are scary enough. I've 'seen' a world where what we enjoy and take for granted will take a backward step, perhaps many backward steps. I used to wonder what technological marvel would be the next to change things the way that recent ones have changed the world we're living in. But now I am fearful. Technology may be able to help but will likely not be the only answer. We humans may have to change our ideas and our expectations to a degree that's presently unthinkable to most, myself included.

In a mediumship address recently a spirit guide spoke through the trance medium in response to a question about climate change etc. He told how humankind has the means to make the changes needed but how it needed to change its approach. I've heard similar before. I didn't find the overall tone of his words positive.

Maybe it was 'confirmation bias' when I listened most closely to the section where he spoke about what we would face if we didn't change, the things we would lose that we take for granted in this world. I found it sobering and just hoped it wasn't his glimpse - outside of time constraints - of what we see as our future.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
Personally, I can't be optimistic. It's hard for me to work out how much of that is due to my depression and how much is due to the actual state of the world, but there's definitely some of each.

I genuinely think that we have passed the tipping point of being able to save this planet, in terms of climate change. Which is not to say that we still shouldn't do what we can to at least forestall the (what I see as) inevitable, but that will only buy us a limited amount of time. The actual planet will probably survive, and hopefully many of the animals, but I don't really foresee humanity continuing (other than maybe just small groups here and there).

I also suspect the U.S. may completely fall apart before the climate does. We aren't doing well right now, with around half of our citizens being completely insane (racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, xenophobic, anti-intellectual, anti-education, right-wing *****-cultist covidiots), and if ******** or another like-minded fascist is elected president, we're done for. I hope that's not what happens; I hope we are able to purge our government of a-holes like ********* and the rest of the right-wing, and I hope ******* either goes to prison, languishes in obscurity, or dies. I suppose we will see.
 

mac

janitor
Like the curate's egg - good in parts. That's my feeling about COP-26 where it appeared there had been a widespread acceptance of the actual current problems due to global climate changes. Understandably there was less agreement about reducing the dependence on and eventual phasing out of fossil fuels, especially coal which has made - and looks set to continue to make - a huge contribution to further warming.

I think historians will look back on this latest conference as pivotal in our climate's future state of warming and - we can only hope - humankind's reaction to the current crisis. An interesting time.
 
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