BruceAdama's Thread

BruceAdama

Established Member
That's a good point, and honestly, I don't know that it isn't. After all, we do have the wretched veil imposed upon us, to impede our learning and development. But it would seem that here, we at least have the freedom of thought. I can't recall specific sources to cite, but it's been implied that in the afterlife realm, we don't or can't have negative emotions/thoughts, which i would imagine include anger, hate, the desire for revenge, etc.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
If there is a god, then I think we must be subject to its rules while here on earth, at least to some extent -- otherwise, if there is an afterlife, I would be able to know that my husband exists there, he would be able to visit me here with no problem or difficulty whatsoever, etc. (but, as you said, instead the damned veil is there). Not to mention the existence of disease, which, if there is a god, that god allows.

As far as having negative emotions and thoughts in the afterlife -- if we truly do have free will, then we can feel whatever we feel, positive or negative. My understanding is more that people believe we won't be inclined to have negative emotions while in the afterlife, since we will supposedly be happy once there, and will understand why particular people may have wronged us in life, etc. I don't know if that's actually how it is, but I think that's generally what people mean when they say there are no negative emotions there, anyway.
 
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mac

janitor
It's nearly eight years since you started your thread, Bruce, and it seems those years haven't changed your outlook much if at all. I wish I could offer something new to try to help you and bluebird but I can't think of anything I haven't said before. :(

I don't know if either of you actually accept the principle of survival beyond death et al but that's the only aspect I have total confidence about. What God is and how it is involved in our lives just isn't important to me although I do have my own tiny appreciation about how it may operate. I am deliberately saying 'it' because I see 'He' and 'Him' and all the other conventions as a crock - they have no relevance to my understanding of God.

I have no uncertainty about there being a something we humans call 'God' and no uncertainty that we're ever away from it and its influence on every single thing we do - even though the 'mechanism' involved in that latter point is misunderstood by almost every single one of us incarnates and discarnates alike.
 

kim

Regular Contributor
I don't know if either of you actually accept the principle of survival beyond death et al but that's the only aspect I have total confidence about. What God is and how it is involved in our lives just isn't important to me although I do have my own tiny appreciation about how it may operate.
Like you Mac, I am totally confident in survival beyond death. I don't believe there is any death anywhere at all, but here on this earth we seem to be fooled by it. I feel we are here to mature in our thinking in order to better care and maintain something beyond our comprehension. To me, the word "God" is an immature word, and needs to be replaced with agape love. That is what's missing here in the world.
 

bluebird

Major Contributor
kim,

To me, to say there is no death is to deny reality, and to diminish the experience of those of us who have had loved ones die (you may also be among this group, I don't know). If you mean to say that you believe that the soul goes on to experience a life/existence after earthly, physical death, then that is a valid opinion -- but our human bodies do die, and our souls, if such things exist, do leave them and go elsewhere. If that were not so, then I would not have been in agony for the past 8 years since my husband died. You are lucky to be confident in survival beyond death; I wish I were.

Regarding your other point, I am agnostic verging on atheist, so I tend to not believe any god exists. If a god does exist, though, then while that god may made of love, may radiate love, etc., unless it is a sentient being of some kind (not necessarily with a physical body, but a soul/mind which is self-aware, has feelings/emotions, makes decisions, etc.), then in my opinion it is not "god". I agree that there is not enough love in this world, but love itself, without sentience, is not god, it is just emotion and impulse. It is hugely important, but it is not god. In other words -- god may in some ways be love, but the emotion of love (whether agape or any other kind) is not, in and of itself, "god".
 

kim

Regular Contributor
Hi BB,

In 2000 my husband left this earth. I was only 37. He was 38. I can sympathize with you when you speak of missing your husband. It took a while for me to get adjusted .

I graduated from high school in 1982 and entered the Navy. I eventually was stationed in Brawdy, Wales. Buying a bicycle was practically the first thing I did when I got to Wales. While riding the bicycle I had a head on collision with a car and wasn't wearing a helmet. I had only been there 2 weeks, so I hadn't adjusted to the change in the traffic pattern that I was accustomed to in America. I experienced an NDE while in a coma due to the accident, but I was alive! I know these bodies we are dwelling in die, but these bodies are not who we are eternally, and the eternal time frame is what I have decided pay close attention to.
 
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bluebird

Major Contributor
kim,

I am sorry for your loss; I sympathize with you as well. I truly meant it when I said you're lucky to have a belief in an afterlife -- I imagine it must bring you comfort. I wish I had faith, but I just don't.

Is your NDE what brought about your belief in an afterlife? (If you don't mind me asking; if you don't want to share, I do understand).
 

kim

Regular Contributor
Hi BB,

Yes, the NDE did bring about assurance of the afterlife. Before the accident I was somewhat like you in the area of faith. I used to hunt for reasons to strengthen my disbelief in what we call god, but getting hit by that car changed everything! I am following something I cannot see or consciousness. I know it will exceed my imagination in the next arena of life.
 
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