Brief Glimpses Behind the Veil…

I’ve believed in an Afterlife since childhood, but never saw anything to really convince me of the existence of other dimensions.
That is, until I had two (extremely brief) experiences.

The first one was many decades ago. As a young man trying to “find” myself and engaging in a sincere search for Spirit, I had time to meditate a couple of times a day. If one closes one’s eyes, even in a very darkened room, what we normally see is a dark shade of grey, without depth.
What happened one morning in meditation is best described as the opening of curtains or parting of drapes.
I was immediately immersed in a field of total blackness, but it wasn’t just a matter of seeing a darker tonal shade. It was a different space, a space of depth, of infinite depth.
I was so shocked by the experience that within a second or two I opened my eyes and it was over. I had blown the chance of exploration that I had so fervently desired. What stuck in my mind was that I had actually experienced Infinity, and the word was no longer just a concept. Even when looking at the stars on a clear night and seeing orbs light-years away, I feel no sense of depth to compare with those two seconds.

I’d always been skeptical of those who’d had a traumatic experience and “forgotten” it, with the memory apparently buried in their subconscious. How could they forget something so intense?
Well, I didn’t sit to meditate again after that morning for about 15 years. Not because I was afraid to (or so I thought), but only because it was never convenient- always something more important to do, not enough time, not the right time, etc.
Fast forward 15 years and I’d resumed my search, reading Robert Monroe’s books and similar. One evening, it hit me- the real reason I’d stopped my practice was fear of a repeat experience. I started meditating again, but of course I never found my self in that space again.

A few years ago I had the 2nd experience. I’d been in the habit for a while before falling asleep, of asking to be taken to a higher dimension, to another, higher realm. This night I suddenly (and I mean suddenly!) “awoke” to a scene-
I was standing on the shore of a lake in the far north, under an azure sky, small fir trees on either side of me, the gin-clear water gently lapping over colorful stones at my feet, a place of pure wilderness. It was like sticking one’s finger in an electric socket, so very intense was the difference in my consciousness from any normal dream, lucid or not.
The intimate scene was beautiful, but it was something way beyond that- it was ALL alive, electric, with an ineffable beauty and intensity that my soul recognized, and such that I yelled out to myself in my sleep, “Yes, YES, there It is, THERE IS ANOTHER DIMENSION, ANOTHER LEVEL OF BEING!”
There was my proof! I thought (and realized). My time there seemed to last only seconds, and I awoke- with tears running down my cheeks.

Some say they never dream, and I envy them. I can’t seem to sleep for 20 minutes without dreaming, occasionally rather lucid.
I’m sure some will disagree, but in my belief, this was not just a dream. The reality and intensity of it were on another level entirely.
 

mac

janitor / administrator
Staff member
Only the experiencer knows how intense their experience was and only that individual can decide if it were a dream or a happening. A similar situation applies with dream c.f. visitation and the intensity is what experiencers tell us about - how different their visitation felt compared with that of a dream.

Your sleep/dream pattern doesn't seem all that unusual compared with what I experience but I tend not to pay much attention to how much I dream - but I don't experience lucid dreaming. Dreams are not my specialty however and the member whose specialty it used to be doesn't visit us any longer.
 

bluebird

Significant Contributor
Interesting, especially the second experience. Thanks for sharing!

Also, I love the description of "gin-clear water" -- vivid and poetic. ;)
 

mac

janitor / administrator
Staff member
On the subject of experiences, one that I found particularly evidential was a description from an individual I'd known for years.

He told me about where he'd "been taken" by his late wife during a visitation/manifestation by her. It was the first time in all the years I'd known him that he had ever mentioned anything of a spiritual nature but what he described matched astonishingly closely the situation I'd long known about from my spiritual research and experiences.

As with a visitation, certain spiritual events you recall vividly even decades later whereas ordinary memories often fade.
 

Ruby

Active Member
I’ve believed in an Afterlife since childhood, but never saw anything to really convince me of the existence of other dimensions.
That is, until I had two (extremely brief) experiences.

The first one was many decades ago. As a young man trying to “find” myself and engaging in a sincere search for Spirit, I had time to meditate a couple of times a day. If one closes one’s eyes, even in a very darkened room, what we normally see is a dark shade of grey, without depth.
What happened one morning in meditation is best described as the opening of curtains or parting of drapes.
I was immediately immersed in a field of total blackness, but it wasn’t just a matter of seeing a darker tonal shade. It was a different space, a space of depth, of infinite depth.
I was so shocked by the experience that within a second or two I opened my eyes and it was over. I had blown the chance of exploration that I had so fervently desired. What stuck in my mind was that I had actually experienced Infinity, and the word was no longer just a concept. Even when looking at the stars on a clear night and seeing orbs light-years away, I feel no sense of depth to compare with those two seconds.

I’d always been skeptical of those who’d had a traumatic experience and “forgotten” it, with the memory apparently buried in their subconscious. How could they forget something so intense?
Well, I didn’t sit to meditate again after that morning for about 15 years. Not because I was afraid to (or so I thought), but only because it was never convenient- always something more important to do, not enough time, not the right time, etc.
Fast forward 15 years and I’d resumed my search, reading Robert Monroe’s books and similar. One evening, it hit me- the real reason I’d stopped my practice was fear of a repeat experience. I started meditating again, but of course I never found my self in that space again.

A few years ago I had the 2nd experience. I’d been in the habit for a while before falling asleep, of asking to be taken to a higher dimension, to another, higher realm. This night I suddenly (and I mean suddenly!) “awoke” to a scene-
I was standing on the shore of a lake in the far north, under an azure sky, small fir trees on either side of me, the gin-clear water gently lapping over colorful stones at my feet, a place of pure wilderness. It was like sticking one’s finger in an electric socket, so very intense was the difference in my consciousness from any normal dream, lucid or not.
The intimate scene was beautiful, but it was something way beyond that- it was ALL alive, electric, with an ineffable beauty and intensity that my soul recognized, and such that I yelled out to myself in my sleep, “Yes, YES, there It is, THERE IS ANOTHER DIMENSION, ANOTHER LEVEL OF BEING!”
There was my proof! I thought (and realized). My time there seemed to last only seconds, and I awoke- with tears running down my cheeks.

Some say they never dream, and I envy them. I can’t seem to sleep for 20 minutes without dreaming, occasionally rather lucid.
I’m sure some will disagree, but in my belief, this was not just a dream. The reality and intensity of it were on another level entirely.
Hello Mark, what an interesting report of your meditation experiences. I know what you mean by seconds being all the time needed to imprint something so unusual on your memory long-term. I wonder why it's so inconsistent and only happened twice? I bought a DVD and tried it without success as I'd just fall asleep, until one time when my mind suddenly went whoosh and I was shocked like you. Haven't tried it again.
 

mac

janitor / administrator
Staff member
I'm not expecting he'll be back to respond, Ruby.....
 
Hello Mark... I wonder why it's so inconsistent and only happened twice? ...one time when my mind suddenly went whoosh and I was shocked like you. Haven't tried it again.
Hi Ruby-I wish I could answer that (and sorry to disappoint you, mac :) ). The second period of my practice was of much longer duration, and I did have one odd experience of physically being more than just the space inside my head ("mind-expanding?"), but nothing like the other two, which were quite dissimilar to each other. I also believe that the time spent was quite beneficial to me, although perhaps not in the way I desired.
I recall reading long ago of a question like that being asked of a very knowledgable soul- "why don't we get more of this stuff, it seems so important and compelling?" His answer was that it would be a distraction to what our work here is about. We shouldn't get hung up on desiring to have weird experiences that, by themselves, are not of much import. We may be allowed to see just enough behind the veil to let us know there's more than this physical time/space, and we'll know and experience more at the appropriate time.
 
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mac

janitor / administrator
Staff member
Well that WAS somewhat unexpected - perhaps your response to what I had written earlier..... ;).
 

Ruby

Active Member
Thanks Mark and hello to mac. I find it hard to believe it could be the case that "we may be allowed to see just enough behind the veil", as if there's a force policing what we can and cannot experience, although perhaps that just happens naturally as it's a rare thing, who knows. I agree that we "shouldn't get hung up on desiring to have weird experiences that, by themselves, are not of much import". We're so keen to get proof. I can think one way and then the other, much like most of us, I suppose.

I have a friend whose son in his twenties still lives at home, having flunked various exams, college courses, and jobs. He was diagnosed with ADHD, not at school, but more recently, and it surely must be on the severe side, as he is violent, disruptive, rants all the time, even through the night about illogical things like his height and the size of his forehead. He was six feet tall when I saw him a few years ago. It doesn't help when celebrities, so called, give interviews about their autism and ADHD when they can function well in the world and earn a good living. Real mental illness is not like that. ADHD involves "executive disfunction, losing items relentlessly, choice paralysis, trouble regulating emotions, problems focusing on things even if they are of interest, hyperfocusing on others". (He hates his Dad, because he thinks he has inherited his problems from him and my friend feels she must keep them apart at all costs, and his father is at a loss as to how to deal with all of this). Because he has a good home, I would imagine, he is not any kind of emergency for the health service and they've been very poorly served by them, I believe. Not much help. They've gone private in desperation as a private specialist thought the older drugs no longer used by the NHS suit ADHD better than the current ones. Nothing has worked so far and they've spent a fortune on counselling, private prescriptions and so on. If he "kicks off" they have to phone the police! On one such occasion, there was no space for him in hospital so they couldn't take him, then had to return as he was awful, took him off, and my friend breathed a sigh of relief, only for him to return at 2am in a taxi! He even burned all his childhood photos in the garden, which really upset her. Anyway, if you've read this far, thank you!
He is keen to try psychedelic drugs, which alarms my friend greatly, but I texted her that there may be some benefit there and it would depend on the clinic and only if thoroughly researched and reputable. Then I thought about meditation, and read your post. She says he's tried mindfulness meditation, but I don't think that's the same thing. There is a Bhuddist centre in their city centre which runs courses and sessions at lunchtime and in the evenings so sounds lively and well-attended. Do you think from your reading that meditation can "rewire the brain" as my friend says he is seeking to do? I thought to try this, if it could help, would be less risky than drugs, as a first approach, and cheaper too since they've spent so much money.
 

mac

janitor / administrator
Staff member
I have a friend whose son in his twenties still lives at home, having flunked various exams, college courses, and jobs. He was diagnosed with ADHD, not at school, but more recently, and it surely must be on the severe side, as he is violent, disruptive, rants all the time, even through the night about illogical things like his height and the size of his forehead. He was six feet tall when I saw him a few years ago. It doesn't help when celebrities, so called, give interviews about their autism and ADHD when they can function well in the world and earn a good living. Real mental illness is not like that. ADHD involves "executive disfunction, losing items relentlessly, choice paralysis, trouble regulating emotions, problems focusing on things even if they are of interest, hyperfocusing on others". (He hates his Dad, because he thinks he has inherited his problems from him and my friend feels she must keep them apart at all costs, and his father is at a loss as to how to deal with all of this). Because he has a good home, I would imagine, he is not any kind of emergency for the health service and they've been very poorly served by them, I believe. Not much help. They've gone private in desperation as a private specialist thought the older drugs no longer used by the NHS suit ADHD better than the current ones. Nothing has worked so far and they've spent a fortune on counselling, private prescriptions and so on. If he "kicks off" they have to phone the police! On one such occasion, there was no space for him in hospital so they couldn't take him, then had to return as he was awful, took him off, and my friend breathed a sigh of relief, only for him to return at 2am in a taxi! He even burned all his childhood photos in the garden, which really upset her. Anyway, if you've read this far, thank you!
He is keen to try psychedelic drugs, which alarms my friend greatly, but I texted her that there may be some benefit there and it would depend on the clinic and only if thoroughly researched and reputable. Then I thought about meditation, and read your post. She says he's tried mindfulness meditation, but I don't think that's the same thing. There is a Bhuddist centre in their city centre which runs courses and sessions at lunchtime and in the evenings so sounds lively and well-attended. Do you think from your reading that meditation can "rewire the brain" as my friend says he is seeking to do? I thought to try this, if it could help, would be less risky than drugs, as a first approach, and cheaper too since they've spent so much money.
Concerning your final question, Ruby, my immediate reaction is that a "....lively and well-attended" centre as you've described it might be among the very worst things for a young person suffering so greatly from effective mental health help. My view of the situation you've described is that this young man first needs intense, probably prolonged, one-to-one, specialised, caring help. Maybe THEN after he's been helped to some degree and perhaps able to focus, maybe THEN he might benefit from meditation guided by a skilled, experienced practitioner.

But I don't think for one moment that it would rewire his brain even were such a thing possible. If, though, he could find help as I've described I think there's a very real possibility that effective meditation could help him manage the very obvious and devastating mental ill-health he suffers with.

I've heard that psychedelics can help in some circumstances but taken under medical supervision. Trying them on your own or without experienced practitioners is a gamble but people do sometimes gamble when they're desperate enough. It's a horrible, desperately sad situation for the young man and his parents who must be in despair. Purely as a layman's thoughts I wonder if they've looked into hypnosis?
 
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