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related matters

Discussion in 'After-Death Communication' started by mac, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    I'll agree that "discarnate" is an excellent substitution for "dead"--concision typically prefers Anglo-Saxon words though--and that its connotations are much more accurate when describing the state of those in Spirit than are the connotations of "dead." But for me, there is a larger issue at stake: we have to stop the near-universal narrative that death is bad, and that it is the end of individual existence. Death is a mere moment of an eternal journey, and it is no more significant than a person on a road trip deciding to switch cars. I can see both sides of this issue though, and my opinion is not as strong as it likely seems.

    This same sort of conundrum also appeared around the identity of Jesus though. The oldest members of Afterlife Forums--I'm not sure if you had joined yet, Mac--will recall that in the beginning, we used to refer to Jesus here by His aramaic name, Yeshua. Why? Because the Christians had ruined the name "Jesus" with inaccurate connotations of a judgmental savior figure. Moreover, "Jesus" is nothing like the original name. (His name in English would actually be Joshua, which is much closer to Yeshua, if one wishes to get technical about it.) So, the argument was made that this Aramaic name would more accurately represent Him. Roberta even used the name "Yeshua" throughout her first edition of The Fun of Dying. Eventually though, we came to realize that we needn't avoid those old, outdated connotations; we needed to confront and disprove them, and the best way to do that was to reclaim Jesus' name as it appears in common usage. New editions of The Fun of Dying use Jesus, as does Roberta's Liberating Jesus--a name which those in Spirit picked out. I think the same argument can be made for "dead" and "dying."
     
  2. RobertaGrimes

    RobertaGrimes Administrator

    Oy. For me it's August. You win, dear ;-).
     
  3. RobertaGrimes

    RobertaGrimes Administrator

    Andrew, you always say things better than I ever could! So, Ditto to all that you say here. Then another few thoughts:

    I think that the way we each refer to the dead is a matter of preference. I personally don't like mincing words - it's the writer in me, I guess - and I have grown to dislike most of the mincing-words terms that people use for the dead. I also don't care for "crossing over" and its variations, so I just say "dying" or "transitioning" (I'm starting now not to like "transitioning," either). So now when I refer to people no longer in bodies I just say "the dead," or "people we used to think were dead," and the word "dying" trips right off my pen. I realize as I read what Andrew says above that I seem to want to demystify the word, since we can't get rid of it from the language and to try to avoid saying it makes it remain perhaps spooky or negative in some way. Once everyone is saying "dead" easily and with full understanding that the word's genuine definition is simply an improvement in the dead person's condition, the world is going to be a much happier place!
     
  4. mac

    mac Staff Member


    I'm assuming you mean August this year?

    I'd guess neither of us wants to be the winner in the old-age stakes, Roberta.
    :(

    You have told me several times in the past that you were the elder, Roberta. So it's August for your 70th? Bags I to be the first to wish you an advance 'Happy 70th Birthday' in case I'm not around (online!!) on the actual day. :)
    (if you'd care to disclose the exact date)

    Will there be cake?
    ;)
     
  5. mac

    mac Staff Member

    In terms of the way we speak, the way we write, we'll just have to go our individual ways.... And that's OK because in connection with the world of the spirit the actual words used are far less important than what they have to tell us. :)
     
  6. RobertaGrimes

    RobertaGrimes Administrator

    Communication is all by thought there anyway, dear. My dear friend, Thomas, finds words to be frustratingly imprecise, now that he is used to thought-communication. Sometimes I re-listen to his communication through Leslie Flint as Thomas Jefferson, who was arguably among the best wordsmiths who ever lived, yet he complains there that communicating through an ectoplasm voicebox is frustratingly imprecise. "Words, words, words, and none of them what you want to say!" Whenever I hear him say that, I smile.
     
  7. RobertaGrimes

    RobertaGrimes Administrator

    Oh my dear, I love getting old! I'm disappointed not to be older than you are. This is like a race, isn't it? We all know now where we're going, and I wouldn't be young again for all the money in the world! I will turn 70 on August 14th. Thank you for your birthday wishes!
     
  8. mac

    mac Staff Member

    It's not the communication 'over there' that's the problem, Roberta. It's the way we have to do it here that causes the difficulties. I concur with Thomas. Our spoken and written words can be clumsy and imprecise but they're all we have to convey our thoughts, ideas, feelings. The better we try to use them the smaller the chance of frustration and misunderstanding. We must not give in to loose or dated usage when they don't do what we want them to.

    Life incarnate often presents experiences not obtainable in the higher realms. It's from those that so much of our spiritual progression is made. The difficulties found in human communication is simply one of those experiences.
     
  9. mac

    mac Staff Member

    There's no race as far as I'm concerned, Roberta.

    You will be young again, of course, and money will not figure in that equation. I find one of the apparently saddest things is that next-time-around we may have lost sight of all we presently know. But from our vantage point after we've passed over we'll likely see it's not sad at all....
    ;)
     
  10. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    I agree, Roberta! In the afterlife literature from the early 20th Century, the dead themselves generally avoid the term "death," but I don't much care for their terminology either. Some say, "When I came out [to this country]..." or "When I underwent the change...;" I've even heard, "When I was borne unto the shore of immortality..."--even the dead can't seem to find a succinct way to describe the transition in earthly language.
     

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