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now this is really off-topic!

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussions' started by mac, Jul 24, 2018.

  1. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    It's a slow summer day and with few members around I probably won't upset many when I write the following. Why do folk anthropomorphise?

    It drives me wild when well-educated, well-qualified wildlife TV presenters refer to young animals as 'babies' 'boys' or 'girls'! Those words relate to humans! :rolleyes: The youngest forms of animals are properly prefixed 'young' or 'baby' so we have baby mice or young elephants. Or we should use the commonly accepted words for something young such as 'duckling' or 'lion cub'. And older, perhaps not yet adult, animals are simply (young) males and (young) females - not boys and girls!

    It's a silly fashion for cutifying animals and it needs to stop. :eek::D Respect and refer to them as what they are - animals. ;)
     
  2. ravensgate

    ravensgate Active Member

    Well, we could start with "The human animal". We could say, "the developing human female". Let's get rid of those sometimes-loaded terms "boy" and "girl"!
    It might make it a bit more convenient and perhaps a bit more "correct", especially in cases where the human is transgender? What would we call him/her then? The transgender human?
    I'm just in the mood for teasing, mac. Hope you won't mind ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2018
    tintoela likes this.
  3. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    Mind? Not at all, fine by me. :D There's little chance of my suggestions being accepted any more than yours, I expect! :D
     
  4. Monika

    Monika Active Member

  5. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    And yesterday evening, on an otherwise entertaining and interesting wildlife TV programme, the presenter declared that a particularly aggressive, bullying chimpanzee was intimidating and subjugating the other males in the group in order that his offspring would be the ones to predominate in that group. What tosh! How on earth could any researcher know if any reason of any sort was in the mind of that chimpanzee? That's anthropomorphism but perhaps to be expected on a programme titled 'Animals Behaving Badly'!

    Much more likely, I contend, is that an excess of testosterone, perhaps accompanied by a mental disorder, drove such unusually aggressive behavior. And male aggressive behaviors towards other males ensure that the dominant males get more opportunities to mate with females. Isn't that what really drives male behavior?
     

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