1. Afterlife Forums is an online, interactive community designed to give seekers direct access to prominent researchers, to afterlife literature, and to one another in order to foster both spiritual growth and public interest in life after death.
    Dismiss Notice

here comes summer, school is out, oh happy day....

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussions' started by mac, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    Winter in the northern hemisphere is over and summer beckons.... ;)

    For a time, now, this website has been getting quieter and as summer arrives proper, the activity level can be expected to be lower than in the winter.

    Have a great summer, you guys, but remember ALF is still there even when you're on your holidays. :)
     
    SashaS and Kurt like this.
  2. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    Even allowing for my prophetic ability (!!) it's almost uncanny how ALF's members have disappeared from view. :D There's been barely a single posting for over a week, I think. Folk must be on their holidays!

    Interesting how little interest there appears to be in matter spiritual when summer arrives. And how interest increases as fall arrives....
     
  3. Monika

    Monika Active Member

    Yes, it seems to be so silent here last times. By myself i have not so much to say about most of topics here. But i like to read what others have to say :)
     
    Bill Z likes this.
  4. ravensgate

    ravensgate Active Member

    In my opinion and experience, the shorter daylight hours of Fall and Winter tend to put humans in a more pensive state. Same when certain events occur, such the loss of a loved one, for example. Or when we read about a person who seemed to "have it all" but chose to get off this world ride for no apparent reason. When we feel depressed, when we mourn, we tend to become more active on spiritual forums. It is, I think, our way of reaching out, trying to find some "meaning". Summer, and especially Spring, tend to provide us with the illusion of renewal and hope of brighter days ahead; spiritual matter tend to get shelved, for a while, and this may be reflected in lower forum activity.
    Well, that's my story, and I'll stick with it! ;)
     
    Kurt and Monika like this.
  5. Monika

    Monika Active Member

    Of course it can be so. I dont know. As by myself i spend now more time at home than before. It was snowing few days now, it was cloudy so i was outside a little. If it is sunny day i just hide at home. Used to like to spend time in sun much more years ago. But now it just irritates me :)
     
    Bill Z and bluebird like this.
  6. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    I've been observing the drop-off of involvement during summer months for a long time. It's perhaps understandable that the dark, gloomy months of autumn and winter bring us low and our thoughts move to deeper, more serious subjects. In general, that is.
     
  7. bluebird

    bluebird Well-Known Member

    Same here. Since my husband died, I prefer to just hide in the house as much as possible, and even more so in good weather, because now spending time outside in nice weather just makes me angry since he isn't here to enjoy it, and because he isn't here I don't enjoy it either. I have never liked summer weather anyway, though, as I hate the heat & humidity; I have always preferred Autumn weather, but now I don't even enjoy that (partly because I really don't enjoy much of anything anymore, and partly because my husband died in Autumn).
     
    SashaS and GoldDustWoman622 like this.
  8. ravensgate

    ravensgate Active Member

    When someone very close to me died, I went through "hell" and for a long time I felt angry. When Spring rolled around (a few months after his passing), instead of feeling that sense of hope and renewal I mentioned in my previous post, I felt really pi--ed off because that person was no longer with us, and I felt his leaving was so unfair, so wrong. Intellectually I knew the anger was due to my grief, but that didn't change how I felt at the time. These days when Spring makes its appearance, I still feel the sense of loss, but the anger is gone. I tell myself - and I believe - that he is alright, and that I will see him again when my time comes. My personal certainty helps me carry on with this earthly ride.
    Bb, Autumn is my very favourite season. Wish it could be Autumn 12 months of the year! :)
     
    GoldDustWoman622 likes this.
  9. bluebird

    bluebird Well-Known Member

    You are truly blessed to have that certainty regarding the afterlife.
    On a more earthly note, I've never understood how anyone could prefer Summer weather to Autumn weather. A nice summer day of about 75 degrees Fahrenheit, with no humidity, is nice every now and then -- but no weather beats a crisp Autumn day, about 50 degrees Fahrenheit, with the smell of woodsmoke in the air, when you're wearing great boots and a jacket, and stop for a hot cup of tea with the one you love, or have the tea alone in a little coffee shop while you read a good book.
     
    ravensgate likes this.
  10. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    You'd do well in the UK then - most of our year feels like autumn! We wait and wait for summer to start and suddenly it's September and it's all over boys.
     
    SashaS likes this.
  11. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    I'm so sick of our perpetual autumn with gloomy, cloudy days. Oh we've got plenty of the 50 degree days you like but they're gray and cloudy - cauldron lid weather I call it. Feels and looks like there's a huge cauldron lid on top of us and just occasionally it's lifted and the sun breaks through for a time before quickly disappearing. I have an ex Brit Aussie friend who still yearns - after 60 years - for the weather he knew in the UK.

    Takes all kinds to make a world, I guess. We each are looking for something....
     
  12. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    As new RVers 13 years ago we lit a 'campfire' in CO as it seemed the thing to do but that was our one and only time - what a smelly, smoky palaver! Now we're shocked that Phoenix, AZ, has 'no burn' days - we can't get our heads around folk EVER burning wood to heat their homes! The Valley is a huge metropolitan area horribly polluted by traffic fumes that are rarely dispersed. Adding to that by burning wood seems nothing short of crazy to us.

    I guess I've become more aware and concerned about the environment we're trashing even though I'll soon be out of it. :(
     
  13. ravensgate

    ravensgate Active Member

    I'm sure I would, mac! A few years back we considered buying a home there, but for some reason it fizzled out. I suppose we were too lazy to find out about taxes, what the UK government requires from those who wish to spend part of the year there, etc. I also heard that in certain areas, "foreigners" aren't too welcome, especially in places like Scotland... not sure about that, of course! So, for now, our options are the sweltering heat of the South, the snobbish part of BC, or remote Newfoundland.
    Not going to spend any time there (BC/NFL) this year, I'm afraid... stuck in the tropical jungle here, lol. What a bummer :(
     
  14. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    Oh in Scotland even us English folk would be foreigners and potentially unwelcome!

    Seriously now, though, one of the major problems in the whole of the UK is that attractive areas naturally attract folk wanting to live - but not work - there. The ones wealthy enough to live, or have second homes, there push up house prices to grotesque levels and they are already sky-high in the UK anyway. That leaves ordinary folk - and young uns particularly - unable to afford to live there. They have to move out and then the workers needed in service industries - shops, cafes, pubs plus builders, plumbers, sparks etc. - can't be found in those towns and villages. This happens also in nearby, pretty Derbyshire plus numerous other counties. London is something else altogether with foreign money and laundered money being dumped into the property market!

    Maybe that's one reason it's thought foreigners aren't welcome in the UK?
     
    ravensgate likes this.
  15. ravensgate

    ravensgate Active Member

    Good food for thought there, mac. Thank you!
     
  16. bluebird

    bluebird Well-Known Member

    Consider Ireland. I'm sure there are a few outliers, but while in Ireland I only met very friendly people, probably friendlier people than I've ever met anywhere else in the world. Plus it's a beautiful country, lovely accent, great traditional music, etc.
     
    ravensgate likes this.
  17. ravensgate

    ravensgate Active Member

    I'm sure I'd like it there.

    Good to know, bb. Used to know an Irish couple; they visited family there every single year and seemed to miss living there. So I asked them if they would consider returning to Ireland, but the man said he would have to go back to school and take several additional courses to continue doing what he did here (he was an x-ray tech).

    Ever watched "Father Brown" (the new series with Mark Williams and Sorcha Cusack) or the Miss Marple series? They show some of the most lovely English villages! Who wouldn't want to live in such places? I wouldn't care if the weather's "lousy", I happen to like the rain (though my hair does not, turns into a Brillo pad!). Just the other day I was telling my daughter that perhaps we should buy a house in the Seattle area and she said, "Eww, it rains all the time there!" Perhaps so, but it would be just fine with me :p
     
    bluebird likes this.
  18. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    We've met quite a few Americans and Canucks who have visited Ireland and without fail they've loved it - but they were vacationers and visiting a place may be very different from living there full-time. ;) Just like snow-birding in AZ compared with being a resident 12 months a year.

    As for buying a holiday spot either in Ireland or in a typically-English village the same aspects I mentioned above applies. Out-of-towners may be resented for the bad effect they have on the village/town economy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2018
  19. Kurt

    Kurt Active Member

    I want to move to the UK eventually, but I feel that as an American, it would be impossible to be accepted. I feel like people try their hardest to come to America, seeing skyscrapers of hype over the horizon & are at a complete loss for words when one of us jumps over the pond.
     
    ravensgate likes this.
  20. mac

    mac senior member Staff Member

    I expect there are plenty of Americans living happily in the UK and totally accepted by us Brits! :)

    The USA has much to offer and I don't find it hard to understand why Brits and others would be attracted by the prospect of living in the USA but to move in either direction essentially only those with family connections or appropriate skills can do it legally.

    I totally understand why citizens from any country might be attracted by living on the other side of the big pond. :D
     
    Kurt likes this.

Share This Page